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Durham College's programs are seen as a benchmark of excellence by many employers across Ontario, and I credit my diploma with opening up many door [...]

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Durham College has an excellent reputation in the technology department. The labs are current and very high-tech!

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Durham College is very dynamic! Students should not be afraid to talk to your teachers as much as you can, they will give you the best advice.

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Electronics Engineering Technology (three-year)

Electronics Engineering Technology (three-year)

Electronics Engineering Technology (three-year)

Wired for success

No other discipline opens as many career doors to the exciting world of high technology as electronics. Electronics engineering technologists design, test, install and service electronic equipment in the fields of computer hardware, software and networking of consumer products; industrial automation; medical equipment; power generation; process instrumentation and control; telecommunications; and test and measurement.

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Program Description

No other discipline opens as many career doors to the exciting world of high technology as electronics. In addition, no other branch of science engineering technology has contributed more to the development of the modern world than electronics. Electronics engineering technicians maintain, operate, test, install and service electronic equipment in the fields of:

  • Computer hardware and software
  • Data communications and the Internet
  • Consumer products
  • Industrial automation
  • Medical equipment
  • Power generation and distribution
  • Process instrumentation and distribution
  • Telecommunications
  • Test and measurement

As a technologist, you have the ability to expand your skills into a wider career path including the design of circuits and projects. Technologists study more advanced courses in math, engineering theory and scientific principles giving them the advanced knowledge to work in:

  • Analysis
  • Complex troubleshooting
  • Data interpretation
  • Decision making
  • Design and planning
  • Preparation of specifications
  • Problem solving
  • Project management
  • Scheduling

Since many technologists move into more advanced levels of engineering as part of their career progression, this program covers theory through the hands-on, practical, project-based learning of:

  • Analog and digital electronic circuits and systems
  • Data communications, networking configuration, installation, security and troubleshooting
  • Instrumentation and control
  • Internet infrastructure and protocols
  • Microprocessor-based controls
  • Process instrumentation and controls
  • Robotics and programmable-logic-controller (PLC)-based controls
  • Telecommunication systems

Energy conservation, environmental awareness and the global environmental movement will have an impact on you as you train to become part of the green workforce. We promote job-ready skills through leading edge instruction and hands-on practical labs that are available to you in and outside of regular class hours.

To ensure program flexibility, the Electronics Engineering Technician and Electronics Engineering Technology programs have a common first and second year.

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Admission Requirements

and

  • Grade 12 English (C, M or U)*
  • Grade 12 mathematics (C, M or U) (Technical Mathematics highly recommended)*
  • Grade 11 or 12 physics (C or U) (highly recommended)
  • Electricity, electronics and mechanical drafting (recommended)

*General Educational Development or Academic and Career Entrance courses may be considered in some programs.

*Alternate mathematics entrance opportunity

If you apply to this program with an alternate mathematic credit as listed below, completed or in progress, you will be considered for admission. However, you must successfully complete an in-house, post-admissions test. Depending on the results you may be required to complete simultaneously an upgrading math course math the college. Please note: There is no additional fee for this math upgrading.

Alternate math credit:

  • Grade 11 mathematics university/college preparation (3M), university preparation (3U)
  • Grade 12 College and Apprenticeship Mathematics (MAP4C)
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Career Options

Graduate employment may be found in a wide variety of industries including:

  • Automotive and parts manufacturing
  • Industrial automation
  • Information technology
  • Medical equipment
  • Military
  • Power generation and distribution
  • Robotics
  • Public transit
  • Telecommunications
  • Transportation 

Past Durham College graduates have found employment with the following job titles:

  • Alarm System Technician
  • Broadcast Engineering Technician
  • Communications Technician
  • Computer Aided Designer
  • Electrical Control Technologist
  • Electrical Technician
  • Electronics Engineering Technician / Technologist
  • Electronic Test Assembler
  • Fibre Optics Communications Technician
  • Junior Radio Frequency Technician
  • Junior Robotics Technician
  • Naval Electronics Technician
  • Nuclear Product Designer
  • Robotics Technician
  • Service Technician
  • Signals and Communication Apprentice
  • Technical Sales
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Course List & Descriptions

Semester 1

Semester 2

Semester 3

Semester 4

Semester 5

Semester 6

Today’s employers give preference to job candidates who are team players with strong verbal communication skills. This course will help students find their voice and develop their ability to work in teams, giving them the competitive advantage they need in today’s job market. It will also strengthen reading comprehension, writing ability, presentation skills and computer application proficiency, all of which are skills fundamental to success in college and in the workplace.

In this course, you will learn to design and test analog electronic circuits using the Multisim simulation software. You will use the LabVIEW software to interface inputs, outputs and control a process. You will also learn to use Microsoft Excel spreadsheet for technical applications, such as tables, calculations, graphing, and charts.  You will also learn about the Arduino Uno microcontroller and C programming. You will learn how to integrate Multisim, MS Excel, MS Word documents into a formal technical report.

A one-semester course designed to educate the student in direct current electric circuit fundamentals. This course is the foundation and prerequisite for multiple electrical and electronic courses, in your program of studies. The course begins with the coverage of SI units, scientific notation, atom structure and electrical quantities. It proceeds with Ohm's law, electrical power, series, parallel and series-parallel circuits, which is the backbone of electric circuit theory. The course concludes with an introduction to Magnetism/Electromagnetism, alternating current/voltage and the mathematical analysis of sinusoidal waveforms. 

This course has three hours of class time configured as one, one hour class and one, two hour class as well as one two hour lab per week.

Elective general education courses appear in your program of study as GNED 0000. This is called a “placeholder.” This placeholder is replaced by an actual course that you will select from a list of available "elective" general education courses when you register in the relevant semester.

Please note that the type and number of elective courses available will vary from semester to semester and from year to year.

Please visit the General Education website for more information.

This foundation course focuses on topics related to the creation and interpretation of engineering drawings using AutoCAD 2011 as a drawing tool. The content includes most topics related to the creation of a new product from initial sketching to: detailed design definition in 2D and and the creation of engineering drawing(s), detail and assembly, including selection and creation of the necessary views, dimensioning, notes, and title block. Related topics and concepts needed to complete drawings such as tolerancing and fasteners are visited.

The intent in this course is that the student will be able to produce a set of engineering drawings using a CAD system that fully documents a design and can be used by the shop or trades people to implement the design.

The purpose of this course is to refresh and upgrade existing mathematical skills such as algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and more.  Emphasis is placed on developing problem solving techniques by applying these math topics to related engineering problems.  Portions of this course will be spent supporting the first year Physics course PHYS 1131.  It is configured as four one hour classes per week.

This course introduces students to the concepts of kinematics, dynamics, gravity, work, energy, torque, power, momentum, circular motion, sound, light and heat through an extensive use of formulas to calculate various physical quantities within these topics.  As a result, the ability to perform algebraic manipulation is an essential skill to succeed in this course and students must also develop a firm understanding and ability to specify the correct units for all of their calculations.  

This course builds upon the generic computer aided drafting and design skills learned by the student in their introduction to AutoCAD course in the first semester. it is one semester course designed to educate the student in the basics of electronics symbols and schematics, circuit simulation with Multisim, printed circuit board design and layout with Eagle software and actual printed circuit board (PCB) productions and electronic project fabrication. To successfully complete this course each student will create all of the necessary electronic and mechanical drawings for a 5v fixed and dual-tracking 0- 15v variable DC power supply. As well, the student will fabricate the printed circuit board from their drawing, punch the holes in the power supply case and assemble all the components to produce a functional power supply.

This course helps students learn the principles and applications of digital electronics. Students receive theoretical and practical training while gaining the foundation for more advanced study. Topics include basic logic gates, inverting logic gates, arithmetic circuits, Boolean algebra, and reduction techniques. Students have ample opportunity to put their training into practise, working on arithmetic circuits in digital computing and control, and the use of CPLDs to solve logic designs.

This course is a continuation of Electricity 1 (ELEC 1131), which focused on DC fundamentals (series, parallel, series-parallel and magnetism). 

Electricity II begins with an introduction to the analysis of Capacitors and Inductors in DC and AC circuits. The course proceeds with the study of Transformers, and AC, RC and RL circuits. It concludes with the analysis of RLC circuits, resonance and passive filters. 

This course is configured as three hours of class and two hours of lab per week.

In this course, you will learn the basic of Electronic circuits and devices. The course begins with the analysis of the P-N junction, which is the foundation of most electronic devices. The course then proceeds with an in-depth analysis of the diode, and its various circuit applications such as rectification, filtering, voltage regulation and light-emitting diodes. Power supply regulators ICs are also introduced. You will then study the basic of transistor, transistor biasing, and transistor amplifier configurations. Electronic circuits will be designed and tested using Multisim, the electronics simulation software.

This is the second of the two first year mathematics courses.  Students develop problem solving skills by applying topics of study to related practical problems.  Topics of study include: quadratic equations; systems of linear equations in two and three unknowns; trigonometric functions; exponents and radicals; direct and indirect variation; complex numbers; sequences; exponents and logarithms; and analytical geometry.  It is configured as four one hour classes per week.

Technical Communication is the “art and science of making complex technical information accessible, usable and relevant to most people in most settings.”  This course reinforces and expands on technical communication skills introduced in first semester, which students will require in the workplace. Students will learn to select and use appropriate research, language, and layout for different technical documents, while further developing their written and verbal communication skills and their ability to work in a team.

The computers and networking course provides electronics and biomedical engineering technology students with the fundamental skills to install and maintain small computer networks. The course starts with the pc and uses hands-on labs to master installation, upgrading, maintenance and basic troubleshooting of workstations. The course then continues with networking the workstations, design of small local area networks, installations and maintenance of a small network. The student will also look at wireless technology and storage area network with specific application in industry.

This course is a continuation of Digital Circuits I (CIRD 1131). Students gain a greater understanding of the principles and applications of digital electronics through theory and practical applications. Topics include arithmetic operations and circuits, multiple Xers and demulti plexers, latches and flip flops, sequential logic and counters. Practical applications in computing and control are emphasized. Students use the 74LS TTL and 74HC CMOS series in lab sessions, advanced CPLD designs and applications.

Electronic Circuits II is a continuation of Electronic Circuits I.  Class A, B, AB, and C power amplifiers are investigated to reveal their power efficiencies.  The Field Effect Transistor (FET) and the MOSFET’s (Metal Oxide Field Effect Transistor) will be introduced; new parameters will be determined and different FET and MOSFET biasing circuits such as self-bias, gate bias and voltage divider bias will be studied. Hence, different amplifier configurations of common source, common drain, and common gate, will be presented.

Opto-electronic devices including photo cell, photo resistor, photo diode, photo transistor and opto-couplers will be studied. The OP-AMP (Operational Amplifier) will be introduced and to concluded, Thyristors (switching devices) such as SCR, SUS, DIAC, TRIAC, and UJT will be covered. 

Theoretical knowledge is integrated with lab exercises. Circuits are assembled and tested to observe whether they comply with theoretical expectations. 

This course will use the circuit simulation software Multisim and the interactive computer program LabVIEW.  This course is configured as 3 hours of lecture and a 2-hour lab per week.

This course is designed to educate the student in the theory of operation and practical implementation of industrial control systems and micro PLC systems. Industrial electrical symbols, ladder diagrams, relays, motor starters, industrial sensors, micro PLC’s and motor control circuits will be covered in detail. The laboratory component of this course provides practical experience with numerous control devices that can be directly related to industrial control systems found in industry. This course is a prerequisite for INDUSTRIAL CONTROLS II (CONT 3131).

This course is a one-semester introduction to communications.  The intent of this course is to present the general principles of electronic communications at a systems level.  The emphasis is on the signal processing functions of two modulation and demodulation operations such as amplitude modulation (AM) and frequency modulation (FM). 

Other topics of instruction include: transmission in general, spectral analysis, transmission lines, and antennas. It is configured as two, one hour classes, and one, two hour lab, per week.

This course introduces the student to the foundations of computer programming using object oriented programming languages. It is designed as an introductory course and assumes little or no prior programming experience. Examples and applications are drawn from the field of electronics and electro-mechanical engineering technology and relate to other courses in the program of studies. Students will also get the opportunity to program interface and control applications with the Arduino microcontroller kit.

This course is a continuation of Digital Circuits II (CIRD 2131). Students further their understanding of the principles and applications of digital electronics. In addition, students examine more advanced concepts such as shift registers, parallel to serial, serial to parallel, ring counters, multi-vibrators and interfacing to the analogue world using A/D and D/A circuits. Using the TTL and CMOS logic families, students gain plenty of practical computing and control experience, implementing complex logic functions with CPLDs.

Electronics Circuits III is a continuation of Electronics Circuits II. One of the most versatile and widely used electronic devices in linear applications is introduced in this course, the operational amplifier or op-amp.

Different op-amps will be studied and given the data sheets of the component, its major characteristics including open-loop gain, slew rate, input voltage range, input impedance, CMRR, input bias current, offset bias current, input offset voltage and output impedance will be determined and compared to those of an ideal op-amp while evaluating their impact on a circuit design.

Negative feedback op-amp circuits will be explained, analyzed and designed and many circuits such as analog adders/subtractors, constant current sources, current-to-voltage converters, voltage-to-current converters, phase shifters, window detectors, filters, oscillators and waveform generators will be designed and troubleshooted. 

The course is complemented by a lab program which will reinforce skills in electrical measurement and analysis of observed data.  The lab experiments will also allow the student to verify principles dealt with during the lecture periods. 

This course will use the circuit simulation software Multisim and the interactive computer program LabVIEW.  This course is configured as 2 hours of lecture and a 2-hour lab per week.

Elective general education courses appear in your program of study as GNED 0000. This is called a “placeholder.” This placeholder is replaced by an actual course that you will select from a list of available "elective" general education courses when you register in the relevant semester.

Please note that the type and number of elective courses available will vary from semester to semester and from year to year.

Please visit the General Education website for more information.

The course covers the theory of operation and practical implementation of three-phase power, industrial control systems and electric motors, as well as AC electronic drives and controls.  A number of power electronic circuits are covered in this area, such as three-phase power rectification and pulse width modulated inverters.  The student will also program and integrate a commercially available AC adjustable frequency drive controller.  The student is required to integrate a PLC, operator controls, sensors, motors, electronic drives, and other electrical components to create a small scale automated system that includes a communications data link for data transfers.  The theory portion of this course is reinforced through practical laboratory experiments.

This one-semester course is designed to further educate students in numerous aspects of industrial automation. The course builds upon the electric motors, industrial controls, DC/AC drives and micro PLCs studied in INDUSTRIAL CONTROLS I (CONT 3123) and INDUSTRIAL CONTROLS II (CONT 3131). The course begins with an introduction to the hardware, programming, and networking architecture of the Allen Bradley SLC 500 system. It continues with the hardware, programming and interfacing of interactive operator touch screens. It then proceeds with an introduction to the hardware, programming and interfacing of industrial robots. The course concludes with students programming and interfacing a SLC 5/04, PanelView touch screen, and industrial robot to create a functional, interactive work-cell. Theory classes will be re-enforced with practical laboratory experiments in each of the three major subject areas. This course is a prerequisite for INTEGRATED AUTOMATION II (CONT 4101), which continues with advanced PLC programming, robotics and work-cell integration.

Students apply the principles of calculus to technical problem solving. Topics in differential calculus include; limits, rates of change, maxima, minima, points of inflection, related rates and optimization. Topics in integral calculus include; motion, area and volume. Basic rules for differentiation and integration are taught.

This is a natural progression of the Electricity II course from Semester 2.  In general, this course reinforces the basic concepts of Ohm's Law, Kirchhoff’s Laws (KCL and KVL) for electric circuits, and introduces the methods used to simplify complex circuits and /or analyze various electric properties of circuits (e.g., voltage, current, resistance and power).  Analysis tools such as: Thevenin’s and Norton theorems, voltage and current dividers, mesh, nodal and loop analysis, and practical voltage and current sources and their interchangeability are emphasized.  This course will demonstrate that the analysis techniques developed for DC circuits will also apply to AC circuits.  The types of AC circuits covered include: RLC series and parallel circuits, filters and resonant circuits.

Furthermore, this course will introduce us to Advance Circuit Analysis, by introducing Laplace Transforms and its application to circuit analysis.

The course is configured as a Hybrid course, with all the main content delivered online, a 1 hour of f2f (Face to Face) contact and a 2-hour lab, per week, so as to involve the student in both the theoretical and practical applications of this field.  This course will use the circuit simulation software Multisim and the interactive computer program MATLAB.

Placement is considered an important part as a technologist’s education, and student are required to obtain a minimum of 80 hours on the job placement in their chosen field and 5 hours of required workshops. There is no formal set of topics of instruction for placement but it must provide the student with practical experience in their chosen field. Each placement will be different as there will be a variety of organizations participating.

Students may achieve their placement requirement in various ways by completing one of the following:

  1. A summer position after second year related to their field of study.
  2. Working one day a week during the fall or winter academic school year.
  3. Working during a block period of time such as the Christmas break, Reading week or in May after all courses work is completed.
  4. Completing an internship for 4,8,12 or 16 months.
  5. Applying for a prior work experience with proper approval and documentation.

Placement is approached as an actual job, with students attending interviews and being selected for positions by the employer. Students are to perform as technologists in training. A satisfactory completion is mandatory in order to graduate from Durham College.

Elective general education courses appear in your program of study as GNED 0000. This is called a “placeholder.” This placeholder is replaced by an actual course that you will select from a list of available "elective" general education courses when you register in the relevant semester.

Please note that the type and number of elective courses available will vary from semester to semester and from year to year.

Please visit the General Education website for more information.

This course builds upon the electrical, electronics, automation and motor controls knowledge obtained from previous courses. It focuses upon industrial instrumentation and the measurement of temperature, pressure, level and flow in a process. The course begins with an introduction to instrumentation, units, instrument characteristics, P & ID symbols/diagrams and the ISA. The course processed with an introduction to a Compact Logix PAC, Human Machine Interface (HMI), and VFD/pump using Ethernet control. The course continues with the analysis of temperature, pressure, level and flow measurement methods, common industrial instruments and the related physics/math/fluid dynamics. During this course, the student is routinely required to integrate a measuring instrument to the analog I/O of a PLC and develop the necessary math calculations and software for the PLC and HMI to display the measured value (process variable). RSLogix 5000 and Factory Talk view will be used to program the PLC, HMI, and VFD, with an Ethernet interface. Theory classes are re-enforced with practical laboratory experiments, in each of the major subject areas, using an industrial grade instrumentation and process control training station. Professional documentation of programs and supporting technical data is required for multiple lab reports throughout the course.

This course will introduce student to microcontroller systems, using a system-on-a-chip (SoC) microcontroller. The course begins with the fundamentals of CPU operation, and then provides the opportunity to program the microcontroller in assembler language as well as the C programming language. The course also provides an overview of contemporary computer architecture. Lab exercises will use both a software simulators and single-board microcontroller development system. Programs will be cross-assembled or cross-compiled from a MS Windows PC to the target system, and will interface with the built-in hardware devices on the development board.

This course introduces students to the basics of signal processing and communication engineering. It also introduces the fundamentals of digital signals and their manipulation. Students compare analogue and digital processing methods, characteristics of signals and characterization of linear systems, such as analogue and digital filters. Other topics include frequency and time domain analysis, and various applications such as sound and image processing

To be developed.

This course lets students apply the fundamentals of microcontrollers programming learned in the Microprocessors I course to embedded system techniques. Lecture topics will cover programming the microcontroller on-chip peripherals, digital-analog interfacing techniques, and advances software techniques in assembler and C. Students will work in labs using a microcontroller single board computer, programmed using a cross-assembler and a C cross-compiler. The labs are supplemented by a project that will focus on embedded software development and project management.

Placement is considered an important part as a technologist’s education, and student are required to obtain a minimum of 80 hours on the job placement in their chosen field and 5 hours of required workshops. There is no formal set of topics of instruction for placement but it must provide the student with practical experience in their chosen field. Each placement will be different as there will be a variety of organizations participating.

Students may achieve their placement requirement in various ways by completing one of the following:

  1. A summer position after second year related to their field of study.
  2. Working one day a week during the fall or winter academic school year.
  3. Working during a block period of time such as the Christmas break, Reading week or in May after all courses work is completed.
  4. Completing an internship for 4,8,12 or 16 months.
  5. Applying for a prior work experience with proper approval and documentation.

Placement is approached as an actual job, with students attending interviews and being selected for positions by the employer. Students are to perform as technologists in training. A satisfactory completion is mandatory in order to graduate from Durham College.

Elective general education courses appear in your program of study as GNED 0000. This is called a “placeholder.” This placeholder is replaced by an actual course that you will select from a list of available "elective" general education courses when you register in the relevant semester.

Please note that the type and number of elective courses available will vary from semester to semester and from year to year.

Please visit the General Education website for more information.

This course is a continuation of Instrumentation and control I (Cont 5131). It begins with the analysis of common flow measurement devices and centrifugal pumps. It proceeds with an introduction to digital trend recorders, process graphing and an analysis of the dynamic characteristics of a process. It continues with the various control schemes and tuning concepts that are typically employed in an industrial process; followed by an introduction to open and closed loop control, process dynamics, control strategies, terminology and process tuning concepts. Final Control elements are discussed and analyzed followed by the coverage of feedback control methods such as On/off, Proportional, Integral and Derivative.

The course proceeds with various tuning methods using an industrial process controller and a PAC. It concludes with the introduction of Cascade, feed forward, limit and override controls. Theory classes are re-enforced with practical laboratory experiments in each of the major topics, using an industrial grade instrumentation and process control training system. The student is routinely required to extract dynamic data from a process, connect, program, tune, analyze and demonstrate the operation of various process control strategies utilizing a digital chart recorder, a PAC/HMI and a dedicated process controller, commonly found in industry. RSLogix 5000 and Factory Talk will be used to program and interface the PAC/HMI/VFD. A Honeywell process controller and associated software is also utilized to program and tune the dedicated process controller.

Professional documentation of programs and supporting technical data is required for multiple lab reports throughout the course.

This course deals with basic statistics for technical personnel and some of the topics in statistical process control (SPC). Students will learn to describe data graphically and numerically; how probability applies to statistics and quality control; normal, binomial, and Poisson probability distributions. They will also study linear regression and correlation. Students will then learn how to apply statistics to process control, including how to use and interpret various control charts for variables and attributes.

This is a capstone project course, offered in the final semester of the Electronics Engineering Technology program to demonstrate mastery of the subject matter.  The student plans, designs, builds, presents and documents a technical report.  A team-based approach by professors and support staff ensures that the student can consult frequently with appropriate subject matter experts on the various aspects of the project.  The student produces a report that is intended to help meet the report writing requirement for certification as a Certified Engineering Technologist under OACETT.

This course is a continuation of the introductory Telecommunications I course.  This course is configured as two, one hour classes, and one, two hour lab, per week.  The lecture content covers two basic areas of electronic telecommunications: 1, that of digital communications, and 2, the use of optical fibres as a transmission medium.  In addition to these two main topics, multiplexing techniques will be discussed and frequency synthesizers will be analyzed and performances predicted. The lab program will involve projects in the above-mentioned subject areas as well as in other related topics.

Courses and course descriptions are for the next academic year and are subject to change.

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Program Costs

 DomesticInternational
Tuition Fees$2,609$11,820
Compulsory Ancillary Fees$1,024$1,584
Incidental Fees$300$300
Total Fees:$3,933$13,704

Note: Students will be required to purchase  an electronics lab kit in addition to the items on their book list.

Please note: fees are based on the 2013-2014 academic year and do not include textbooks. For more information please see Other fees to consider.

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Internships & Placements

You will develop hand-on industry experience during the completion of a mandatory field placement consisting of a minimum of 100 hours related to your program of study.

 

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Opportunities For Degree Completion Or Additional Credentials

Qualified graduates may be eligible to apply their academic credits toward further study through Durham College’s partnerships with many Canadian and international colleges and universities.  

UOIT Bachelor of Applied Science (BASc) (Honours) – Nuclear Power Bridge

Graduates of this program with a minimum 70 percent or better average can apply to the UOIT Nuclear Power Bridge program, which leads to a BASc in Nuclear Power degree. You can apply to this program through the Ontario Universities Application Centre website (www.ouac.on.ca) using the program code DNB.

If you are a domestic or internationally education student with a Bachelor of Engineering degree in Electrical or Electronics Engineering, you may be eligible for the fast-track delivery. Please see the fast-track offering: Electronics Engineering Technology (compressed fast-track)

Please visit the Transfer Guide for more information.

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Disability Considerations

Students with disabilities who wish to discuss accommodation plans are encouraged to contact the Centre for Students with Disabilities.

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